Video 29 Mar 355 notes

houghtonlib:

The women’s petition against coffee : representing to publick consideration the grand inconveniencies accruing to their sex from the excessive use of that drying, enfeebling liquor, 1674.

*EC65.A100.674w

"Our men, who in former Ages were justly esteemed the Ablest Performers in Christendome; But to our unspeakable Grief, we find of late a very sensible Decay of that true Old English Vigor; our Gallants being every way so Frenchified, that they are become meer Cock-sparrows, fluttering things that come on Sa sa, with a world of Fury, but are not able to stand to it, and in the very first Charge fall down flat before us. Never did Men wear greater breeches, or carry less in them of any Mettle whatsoever."

The mens answer to the womens petition against coffee : vindicating their own performances, and the vertues of that liquor, from the undeserved aspersions lately cast upon them, by their scandalous pamphlet, 1674.

*EC65.A100.674m

Houghton Library, Harvard University

Video 28 Mar 1,276 notes

thdark:

otomblr:

mendelpalace:

deliciousironing:

Flower (1979) from Memories: The Collection. Supposedly the first comic drawn by Otomo after reading Moebius for the first time. Colours also by Otomo. 

The whole thing.

I gotta say, I really like Otomo in Moebius-mode. 

Repost for all-in-one-osity

I’m doing all I can to not go on an Otomo reblog spree, so have this Moebius-esque comic he did, because the fact it exists makes me very happy.

Video 24 Mar 1,590 notes

karamazove:

Famous paintings revisited as photographs

Video 24 Mar 9 notes

gavincastleton:

Read the backstory here.

"that’s when he learned that you DON’T STEP TO GAV CAZ ON TWITTER"

Photo 21 Mar 20 notes

(Source: sweetmath)

Text 21 Mar 30 notes The Patron Saint of Cel Companies

gavincastleton:

As anyone that follows me on Twitter may be aware, I often use it to complain about corporations that specialize in horrible customer experiences. I don’t just do it to amuse myself (though it realllly does), and I don’t just do it because Twitter is the least responsive social network for humans; I do it because it can be a very effective way to get a situation rectified.

Recently, a user named @GotALottaSwagg responded rudely to a four-day-old anti-Sprint tweet:

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I visited his profile to try to figure out what our relation was:

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I got his name, Justin Crawford, from Google, and found a very thin Google Plus profile, but no Facebook account.

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He was not following me. He was, however, following Sprint Care (and Verizon Care). And a bunch of strippers.

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Scattered throughout a barrage of racist, sexist, and extremely horny tweets like these:

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were repeated attacks on users complaining about Sprint. Like this:

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and this:

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and this:

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and this:

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and this:

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and this:

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Weird, right? But weirder still, since he wasn’t a follower of mine (or any of his other targets), my correspondence with Sprint Care would not have appeared in his feed. To see it he would either have had to A) browse to the Sprint Care profile, change the default feed display (clicking “All” as pictured below), and scroll through hundreds and hundreds of tweets PER DAY (loading 15 at a time) to get to my 4-day old tweet and respond to it (scrolling back 4 days took me over 30 minutes)…  

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OR

B) see it on a brand-awareness-management app like Tweetdeck, while monitoring the Sprint Care Twitter account as an employee at the Sprint Call Center in Hampton, VA, and then respond from his personal account.

There was a “JC” working the Sprint Care account on every day that he attacked customers, except for Mar 17. On Mar 17 there was a “JAC” working the account. 

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Sprint Customer service refused to connect me to the Hampton Call Center, and would not confirm whether or not a “Justin Crawford” worked there. They did say he wasn’t on IM at that time.

Seems like the kind of thing that could get someone fired, no?

#StepIntoTheRealmYou’reBoundToGetBlazed

wat

Quote 19 Mar 99 notes
And, really, what can one say about Objectivism? It isn’t so much a philosophy as what someone who has never actually encountered philosophy imagines a philosophy might look like: good hard axiomatic absolutes, a bluff attitude of intellectual superiority, lots of simple atomic premises supposedly immune to doubt, immense and inflexible conclusions, and plenty of assertions about what is “rational” or “objective” or “real.” Oh, and of course an imposing brand name ending with an “-ism.” Rand was so eerily ignorant of all the interesting problems of ontology, epistemology, or logic that she believed she could construct an irrefutable system around a collection of simple maxims like “existence is identity” and “consciousness is identification,” all gathered from the damp fenlands between vacuous tautology and catastrophic category error. She was simply unaware that there were any genuine philosophical problems that could not be summarily solved by flatly proclaiming that this is objectivity, this is rational, this is scientific, in the peremptory tones of an Obersturmführer drilling his commandoes.
— David Bentley Hart’s hilariously brutal (and great) criticism of Ayn Rand (via ontologicalshakedown)

(Source: firstthings.com)

Photo 12 Mar 296 notes cybertunage:


/unconditional Nihei reblogging

cybertunage:

/unconditional Nihei reblogging

(Source: projectfrontera)

Video 11 Mar 7,561 notes

vigilantecrusade:

Ivan Aivazovsky

pretty sublime.

Photo 11 Mar 3 notes

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